Tag Archives: sexual ethics

WATCH THIS SPACE

non-Hunger-Games post coming soon.  (i need another week at least, as i’m rereading Book I.)

probably a response to the feedback/criticism/support i got on the ‘blueballing’ and ‘slut-shaming’ remarks for Easy A.

probably also a comment on eating disorders — Demi Lovato just skyrocketed to the top of my blog-about-this list, with her latest music video:

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Pop Quiz! Teacher Needs A Smoke Break*

*disclaimer: i never have and never will smoke cigarettes, bli neder

As my FB friends already know, my apartment was burglarized last Thursday night while I was downtown.   All of my electronic valuables are gone, which includes some 25 links I had saved to blog about.  As I need to spend this week dealing with the aftermath of the Apartment Incident, I will not be able to blog at my usual standards this Wednesday.    I sincerely hope to have my electronic life functional by next Wednesday, but I make no promises.   Please enjoy this amuse-bouche while I sort Things out.

 

  • INTERVIEWER: When a comedy is this raunchy, is there such a thing as going too far?
  • JESSE EISENBERG: There is stuff in this movie that I’m uncomfortable with. I don’t like to use the “R” word, for example. Rape, for example. I’m very uncomfortable with that word, personally because I do work with domestic violence organisations and I’m very aware of the alarming statistics of women who are abused. So I’m very uncomfortable with that. I’m not uncomfortable with the sexual jokes. Sometimes I think they’re less funny than others, I don’t care about that, cos it doesn’t harm anybody. I’m uncomfortable with saying “rape,” I don’t like saying that, I never say it in my life. If somebody says it, I cringe. I don’t like it when people make jokes about that word. I’m a little bit uncomfortable with it, but I was hired to do a job. I thought most of the movie was good and kind of respectful to people in general. The movies that really bother me are rich white people lamenting their lives when they have, like, a million dollars. That to me is more offensive than sexual humour. A rich, white person lamenting their million-dollar kitchen and the audience is supposed to sympathise with that character, to me, that’s pathetic. Whereas, in this movie I thought the characters were real and my job was to take my character seriously.
(Citation sticklers will notice that the “interview” link will take you to a feminist fan tumblr that I approve of, not the actual interview.   If you want to track the original down, i’d appreciate it.)
I have italicized the parts that I think are most interesting.   I haven’t seen enough of JEisenberg’s work to make a comment about his talent, skills, or public persona.
What do you think of his statement?  What about the choice of the word “uncomfortable”? What sort of responsibilities do young actors have regarding their characters?   Does that change when you are as prominent as JEisenberg?  Does the fact that he is less offensive on Womyn’s Issues than Charlie Sheen or Donald Glover (I’ll blog about him later) absolve him from moral or logical lapses in judgment?   Do you even think there’s a lapse in judgment here?
Discuss!  (I will probably not comment on this discussion, but after I’ve seen Zombieland when Alice comes to visit, maybe I will.)
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