Tag Archives: sexism

A Brief Comment on Advertising

This is lifted directly from my tumblr from several weeks ago:

Rest of post temporarily moved to after the jump due to layout issues!

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Why I’m Boycotting Season 3: Confessions of an Ex-Gleek

The following post contains all of my relevant feelings about Glee.  As of September 2011, I do not anticipate blogging about this show again.  Ryan Murphy done me wrong one time too many.   I would never command anyone to stop watching a show, but I don’t think it deserves any more of my energy.   I have been known to get literally upset during in-person Glee arguments before, and it was time for me to call it quits for my own sanity.   I welcome your comments, but you are not going to change my mind. 

Friends, Romans, countrymen, I must get this off my chest:

I am an ex-Gleek.

Given my unabashed love for all things Broadway, you shouldn’t be surprised.  I also love high school dramedies, goofy pop covers, and Darren Criss.   Really, it’s no wonder it took me until “Rumors”  (Season 2 Episode 19, The One Where That Blonde Guy Is Poor) to give up in a huff.  I actually haven’t even seen the return of Jesse St. James (Jonathan Groff) except for the “Rolling In The Deep” clip.   And I don’t even care.

Those of you who have always been feminists or annoyed by this show are no doubt wondering what took me so long.  Those of you who are obsessed with this show are no doubt wondering why I’m a humorless, self-righteous witch.   That’s fine.   I’m pretty used to straddling that divide.  :-p

The thing is, Glee had so much potential.   The first half of Season One was witty, irreverent, campy, and GOOD.  It was deliberately making fun of not just High School Musical but all the teen dramas that had come before it as well as all those Inspirational Teacher films like Freedom Writers.  (BTW, I hear that’s a decent movie, but the book was boring. Stand and Deliver is 1000 times more interesting.)   It seems pretty clear it was originally intended for adults, not high schoolers.   Back then it didn’t matter that half the cast looked 25 or there were too many people to keep track of.  Glee was like that sarcastic gay dude you skipped classes senior year with, the one who taught you how to smoke cigarettes and hold your liquor and could do a flawless Barbra impersonation at the drop of a hat.*

*My sarcastic gay friend was straightedge, and so was I.

Thing is, Glee got popular and Ryan Murphy got self-involved.   Reportedly that’s happened on his previous shows as well.   It stopped being about clever cruelty and cute covers and started being about BEING GLEE.   The writing got schizophrenic and the guest stars started rolling In.  Also, they started doing After School Specials that were neither clever nor properly moral-ed.  I maintain that the only two guest stars who were worth it are Kristin Chenoweth as April Rhodes and John Stamos as Emma’s Hot Dentist Husband.   And you’ll notice both of them had actual character arcs.   Gwyneth Paltrow doesn’t count because she’s awful.  Actually awful.  What’s the point of singing Cee-Lo Green if you’re going to do the radio edit?

Basically, when the show started really sucking I started noticing all of the -isms going on.  They’d always been there under the surface (or maybe openly in the name of satire), but Fox is the channel that has the Simpsons and Family Guy, so for a while I accepted it as part of the package with my primetime Broadway entertainment.

Then, “Blame It On The Alcohol” (Season 2 Episode 14) happened.

It is actually surprising how long it took me to find a full version of this scene:

Fangirl Reponses

Yes, he is.

-In Which I Talk About This At Length, With Video, For The Last Time

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It works every time: Beer, gender, and race.

(A break from the 30 day thing to bring you this):

OK, so he's not holding a beer bottle, but it could be beer in that whiskey bottle.

Ah, September is halfway through, the air is finally cooling down, textbooks are arriving at my doorstep, and Orientation Week is less than a week away. For me, Orientation Week mainly means one thing, and that one thing is beer, ladies and gentlemen (and any ladyboys and gentlewomen that may be reading). I freaking love beer, but it always tastes so much crisper in that blissful week before school starts where everyone is a wily first year again, drinking themselves into oblivion in a frantic, seemingly endless bacchanal before the strike of First Week, in which we run frantically back to the library to once again do labor for the tenured wicked stepsiblings, and our livers turn back into the pumpkins they were when we first arrived and a fairy godmother whisked us away from parents to a soundtrack of bagpipes into the grand ball that is COLLEGE. Almost immediately tonight, I wondered why I haven’t bought my O-Week supply of beer yet. Maybe because I’m on the raw food thing and beer is not raw. I think I will be merciful to myself and buy myself a six-pack of 312 this weekend to last for the week. After all, it is my last Orientation Week. Anyways, I stumbled across a picture of “Chick Beer” today, and first I thought BEER, but then I realized the name is kind of goofy.

MORE BEER IF YOU CLICK THIS BUTTON. CLICK! CLICK! CLICK CLICK! THATS OKAY! YOU SHOULD MAKE SAFE RESPONSIBLE O-WEEK INTERNET BROWSING CHOICES! THATS OKAY! YOU SHOULD MAKE SAFE RESPONSIBLE O-WEEK INTERNET BROWSING CHOICES! THATS OKAY! YOU SHOULD MAKE SAFE RESPONSIBLE O-WEEK INTERNET BROWSING CHOICES! THATS OKAY! YOU SHOULD MAKE SAFE RESPONSIBLE O-WEEK INTERNET BROWSING CHOICES!

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WATCH THIS SPACE

non-Hunger-Games post coming soon.  (i need another week at least, as i’m rereading Book I.)

probably a response to the feedback/criticism/support i got on the ‘blueballing’ and ‘slut-shaming’ remarks for Easy A.

probably also a comment on eating disorders — Demi Lovato just skyrocketed to the top of my blog-about-this list, with her latest music video:

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Pop Quiz! Teacher Needs A Smoke Break*

*disclaimer: i never have and never will smoke cigarettes, bli neder

As my FB friends already know, my apartment was burglarized last Thursday night while I was downtown.   All of my electronic valuables are gone, which includes some 25 links I had saved to blog about.  As I need to spend this week dealing with the aftermath of the Apartment Incident, I will not be able to blog at my usual standards this Wednesday.    I sincerely hope to have my electronic life functional by next Wednesday, but I make no promises.   Please enjoy this amuse-bouche while I sort Things out.

 

  • INTERVIEWER: When a comedy is this raunchy, is there such a thing as going too far?
  • JESSE EISENBERG: There is stuff in this movie that I’m uncomfortable with. I don’t like to use the “R” word, for example. Rape, for example. I’m very uncomfortable with that word, personally because I do work with domestic violence organisations and I’m very aware of the alarming statistics of women who are abused. So I’m very uncomfortable with that. I’m not uncomfortable with the sexual jokes. Sometimes I think they’re less funny than others, I don’t care about that, cos it doesn’t harm anybody. I’m uncomfortable with saying “rape,” I don’t like saying that, I never say it in my life. If somebody says it, I cringe. I don’t like it when people make jokes about that word. I’m a little bit uncomfortable with it, but I was hired to do a job. I thought most of the movie was good and kind of respectful to people in general. The movies that really bother me are rich white people lamenting their lives when they have, like, a million dollars. That to me is more offensive than sexual humour. A rich, white person lamenting their million-dollar kitchen and the audience is supposed to sympathise with that character, to me, that’s pathetic. Whereas, in this movie I thought the characters were real and my job was to take my character seriously.
(Citation sticklers will notice that the “interview” link will take you to a feminist fan tumblr that I approve of, not the actual interview.   If you want to track the original down, i’d appreciate it.)
I have italicized the parts that I think are most interesting.   I haven’t seen enough of JEisenberg’s work to make a comment about his talent, skills, or public persona.
What do you think of his statement?  What about the choice of the word “uncomfortable”? What sort of responsibilities do young actors have regarding their characters?   Does that change when you are as prominent as JEisenberg?  Does the fact that he is less offensive on Womyn’s Issues than Charlie Sheen or Donald Glover (I’ll blog about him later) absolve him from moral or logical lapses in judgment?   Do you even think there’s a lapse in judgment here?
Discuss!  (I will probably not comment on this discussion, but after I’ve seen Zombieland when Alice comes to visit, maybe I will.)
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Sexism and Sexists: What did you call me?

One of the problems facing feminist discourse in the United States (it probably exists in other places, but I’m speaking from my own experience) is a conflation of action, intention and identity. Which is to say, when an action is deemed sexist or in some way problematic, it is almost automatically assumed by the public at large that this is an ascription of malicious intent, along with a deeming of the person at fault to be in some way a fundamentally bad person. It probably began with Locke, when in a single sentence of the Second Treatise on Government, he discusses a murder, and then calls the perpetrator a murderer. It’s also probably a cognitive bias of some kind. Whatever the source, this phenomenon undermines the ability of feminists to engage in criticism of actions or messages found in the broader culture, since these frequently stem from the choices of a single individual or organized group, and such entities tend not to take kindly to being called sexist, misogynistic, privileged, or something similar.

Even if they are! Read on for how this applies to the DSK and BHL cases

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